Saturday, 20 December 2014

Lesser Known Facts about IIHMR

IIHMR University is a premier university of academic excellence in healthcare sector. For the past 31 years this university has been working constantly to provide better health solutions in India and overseas. Over the past 3 decades the Institute has made a distinct place for itself and becoming a leading organization in the country engaging itself in health management, research, education and training to fulfill its mission to dedicate itself to the improvement in standards of health through better management of health care and related programs.    

Apart from having world class architecture, Dr. D. A. Anderson Library, infrastructure and lush green environment, IIHMR has been home of renowned faculty, students and some species of birds. In a place like Jaipur which has less Flora and Fauna diversity because of Desert area IIHMR serves as a home of about 44 different species of birds. Most of the birds are found in Indian Subcontinent especially in plains. 

Brahminy Myna
Brahminy Myna


Brahminy Myna or Brahminy Starling found only in Indian Subcontinent. Its head has a black crown nape (back of the neck) and crest, and the underneath of the tail is white





Shikra
Shikra


Shikra or Hawk of woodland found in India and Africa. Also know as “Little Banded Goshawk. It produces loud piercing calls







Rufous Tree Pie
Rufous Tree Pie



Rufous Tree Pie a bird with scooty head and neck and impression of grey, black and white in wings and tails and makes very musical calls is easily sight able in the campus.






Asian Pied Starling
Asian Pied Starling

Asian Pied Starling also known as Pied Mynas are starlings found in South and Southeast Asia. They are locally known as Gursal, Ablak and Ablaki Maina.  IUCN (2006) listed them recently as among “100 of the World’s Most Invasive Species”. Birds in a group call frequently with a wide repertoire that includes whistles, trills, buzzes, clicks, and warbling calls. Young birds taken into captivity have been trained to imitate tunes of other birds.



Common Myna
Common Myna
Common Myna also known as Indian Myna. It is an omnivorous open woodland bird with a strong territorial instinct IUCN Species Survival Commission declared it one of the world's most invasive species and one of only three birds in the top 100 species that pose an impact to biodiversity, agriculture and human interests



Oriental Magpie Robin
Oriental Magpie Robin
The Oriental Magpie Robin is distinctive black and white birds with a long tail that is held upright as they forage on the ground or perch conspicuously. They are particularly well known for their songs and were once popular as cagebirds. The oriental magpie-robin is national bird for Bangladesh. People of Bangladesh recognize it as "Doyel".



Indian Robin
Indian Robin

Indian Robin is a familiar plains bird, coming freely round houses and spending most of its time on the ground. Easily identified by the habit of holding the long tail erect so as to exhibit a bright chestnut patch below its base. In character it exhibits the curious mixture of boldness and suspicion.



Indian Silverbill
Indian Silverbill


The Indian Silverbill or White-Throated Munial is a tiny gregarious bird which feeds mainly on seeds. It frequents dry open country and cultivation, especially near water. Creamy underside with darker upperside, often displaying dark to black primaries along the lower edge of the folded wing, as well as a dark tail that is often somewhat pointed.






Purple Sunbirds
Purple Sunbirds

The Purple Sunbirds are small, nectar-feeding birds that belong to the sunbird family. Local movements are noted especially in the drier parts of northwestern India and Pakistan where they are said to arrive in large numbers before summer. Purple sunbirds are quite noisy, with a song that is described as a rapid rattle followed by ringing, metallic notes; and calls




Loten's Sunbird
Loten's Sunbird
The Loten's Sunbird, Long-Billed Sunbird or Maroon-Breasted Sunbird is a sunbird endemic to peninsular India and Sri Lanka. Its long bill distinguishes it from the similar purple sunbird that is found in the same areas and also tends to hover at flowers. Like other sunbirds, it feeds on small insects and builds characteristic hanging nests. The species is named after a colonial Dutch governor of Ceylon, Joan Gideon Loten.


Lapwing
Lapwing

Lapwing also known as the Peewit in imitation of its display calls, its proper name describes its wavering flight. Its black and white appearance and round-winged shape in flight make it distinctive, even without its splendid crest. This familiar farmland bird has suffered significant declines recently and is now an Red List species



Egret
Egret
An Egret is a bird that is any of several herons, most of which are white or buff, and several of which develop fine plumes (usually milky white) during the breeding season. The word "egret" comes from the French word "aigrette" that means both "silver heron" and "brush", referring to the long filamentous feathers that seem to cascade down an egret's back during the breeding season.



Oriental white-eye
Oriental white-eye

The Oriental white-eye is a small passerine bird in the white-eye family. It is a resident breeder in open woodland in tropical Asia. They forage in small groups, feeding on nectar and small insects. They are easily identified by the distinctive white eye-ring and overall yellowish upperparts. These white-eyes are sociable and lives in flocks They are highly arboreal and only rarely descend to the ground.


Koel
Koel


The Koel belongs to Cuckoo family is a musical Bird and is widely used symbol in Indian poetry. The Asian koel is a brood parasite that lays its eggs in the nests of crows and other hosts, who raise its young ones. Males and females Koel are distinct in appearance. The male is glistening black, with yellowish green bill and crimson eyes. The female is dark brown, with profusely spotted and barred with white.





Coucal
Coucal
A Coucal is one of about 30 species of birds in the cuckoo family. Unlike many Old World  cuckoos, coucals are not brood parasites. Coucals are rather terrestrial, preferring to walk than fly. They emerge in the open only in the early morning. The rest of the day, they forage on foot in tall grass. When disturbed, they make a short flight with shallow wing beats and brief glides into cover. They then scuttle away on foot. They are strong runners and have straight hind claws and are sometimes called "lark-heeled cuckoos".